What I have learned from working with color in a fuzzy context

Between 2018 and 2020 I created over 1500 abstract digital color explorations as an attempt to understand how color works and how to make it “shine”. In these explorations, I repeatedly relied on gradients and blurry boundaries because of their inherent softness. Hard color edges, at least at first, felt harsher.

Besides, I liked the idea of creating atmosphere through color, and gentle transitions were perfect for that — just look at a Mark Rothko or Peter Alexander!

As I practiced, I eventually collected a few tricks to control “blurriness” and make color look its best in this context. …


Don’t mariekondo your fluorescent yellow t-shirt yet

Main image displaying various fluorescent swatches: two pinks in different intensities, a green, an orange and a yellow.
Main image displaying various fluorescent swatches: two pinks in different intensities, a green, an orange and a yellow.

Fluorescent colors seem to be coming from a different, brighter planet, causing everything else to dull in comparison. That is because they absorb ultraviolet rays, invisible to humans, and convert them into visible light. In short, they emit an additional brightness on top of the “regular” light reflected off their surface.¹

This makes them the perfect candidates for safety-related accessories and attention-grabbing sticky notes, yet they are not difficult to spot within the more expressive spheres of art, fashion or even interiors, bringing along connotations ranging from danger and nonconformity to ebullience and joy.

I personally wasn’t clear on how…


How I learned to combine colors more intentionally by focusing on the amount of stimulation they create

Whether it was graphic design, illustration or lettering, color was a recurring theme in my work. In spite of my attraction to it, I used it, however, as no more than a secondary tool.

Until I gave it my full attention.

In 2018, I started devouring anything color-related. Josef Albers taught me how colors influence each other. Johannes Itten opened my eyes to numerous types of color contrasts. Riccardo Falcinelli’s all-encompassing Cromorama fascinated me with scientific facts. Margrethe Odgaard opened up color to my other senses and less tangible emotions. …

Ruxandra Duru

Ruxandra enjoys experimenting with color, writing and investigating. She also designs book covers and occasionally illustrates and draws letters.

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